Liberation and sexism in France

The third chapter of Media and Politics in a Globalizing World, devoted to political elites, opens with the example of French presidential hopeful Dominique Strauss-Kahn, who fell from grace as head of the IMF when a hotel maid accused him of sexual harassment in New York. DSK’s proclivities were not news, but the French media… Continue reading

More

The Wrong Narrative

The outcome of the general election in Britain was a surprise to many. In a blog in The Conversation today, Professor Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, of the School of Journalism at Cardiff University, reflects on what happened. The dominant narrative of the campaign, as she and many others see it, was that the election would result in… Continue reading

More

Why can’t tyrants take a joke?

Writing on the Al Jazeera website today, Hamid Dabashi, Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, asks why politicians and tyrants throughout the world can’t take a joke. ‘Why are powerful generals, murderous tyrants, and stuck-up theocrats so incensed when someone makes fun of them?’ He notes that a Malaysian cartoonist was… Continue reading

More

Celebrity Politics and Nuclear Weapons

This week brings another example of prominent figures from the world of entertainment using their power of visibility to influence political outcomes. In an open letter published in the UK’s Observer newspaper, Mercury prizewinning band Young Fathers, Massive Attack and comedian Frankie Boyle are among those who have expressed concern that both main parties have… Continue reading

More

Game of Thrones and the Revolution

Every now and then, a film or television series comes along that sparks a slew of papers  and intensive discussion at academic conferences because of what it says about politics and our own world. Game of Thrones is one such cultural phenomenon. Writing in The Guardian recently, journalist Paul Mason – who has famously referred… Continue reading

More